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Here is a snapshot of an article Adrian Higgins wrote for The Washington Post.  If this interest you then copy & past the link below or head over to our Facebook page to read the full article. If you do make sure to let us know what you thought about it in the comments.
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One of the reasons the lawn remains the ubiquitous feature of our landscapes, even in small urban gardens, is that humans are wired for tribalism, says biologist Doug Tallamy. Conformity is a sign of belonging, and who wants to be the first person on the block to shrink, if not ditch, that immutable, non-threatening, neighborly lawn? Well, Tallamy does, for one.
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Tallamy became the darling of the native plant community with his 2007 book, “Bringing Nature Home,” which provided a scientific basis for replacing the exotic ornamentals that dominate our gardens with home-grown perennials, ground covers, shrubs and trees. Indigenous flora, Tallamy says, supports far more of the insects, birds and other creatures that co-evolved with them than a ginkgo from China, say, or an azalea from Japan.
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In his latest book, “Nature’s Best Hope,” he presents a full-blown manifesto that calls for the radical rethinking of the American residential landscape, starting with the lawn.
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Tallamy, an entomology professor at the University of Delaware, makes a compelling case that the loss of forests, meadows, wetlands and the rest to development over the past 200 years has left wildlife clinging to ever-shrinking, fragmented habitats.
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But if the calamity is staring us in the face, so, too, is the solution. There are almost 130 million parcels of residential land in the United States that together can restore lost biomes. If everyone started to reduce that biological wasteland known as the lawn in favor of native plants, including trees, Tallamy says we could create one big connected habitat for species we are driving to the brink.
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http://ow.ly/IFHQ50ylOWo
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#siteworkstudios #landscapearchitecture #landscapearchitect #landplanning #urbandesign #urbandesigner #landscapedesign
Here is a snapshot of an article Adrian Higgins wrote for The Washington Post. If this interest you then copy & past the link below or head over to our Facebook page to read the full article. If you do make sure to let us know what you thought about it in the comments. ➖ One of the reasons the lawn remains the ubiquitous feature of our landscapes, even in small urban gardens, is that humans are wired for tribalism, says biologist Doug Tallamy. Conformity is a sign of belonging, and who wants to be the first person on the block to shrink, if not ditch, that immutable, non-threatening, neighborly lawn? Well, Tallamy does, for one. ➖ Tallamy became the darling of the native plant community with his 2007 book, “Bringing Nature Home,” which provided a scientific basis for replacing the exotic ornamentals that dominate our gardens with home-grown perennials, ground covers, shrubs and trees. Indigenous flora, Tallamy says, supports far more of the insects, birds and other creatures that co-evolved with them than a ginkgo from China, say, or an azalea from Japan. ➖ In his latest book, “Nature’s Best Hope,” he presents a full-blown manifesto that calls for the radical rethinking of the American residential landscape, starting with the lawn. ➖ Tallamy, an entomology professor at the University of Delaware, makes a compelling case that the loss of forests, meadows, wetlands and the rest to development over the past 200 years has left wildlife clinging to ever-shrinking, fragmented habitats. ➖ But if the calamity is staring us in the face, so, too, is the solution. There are almost 130 million parcels of residential land in the United States that together can restore lost biomes. If everyone started to reduce that biological wasteland known as the lawn in favor of native plants, including trees, Tallamy says we could create one big connected habitat for species we are driving to the brink. ➖ http://ow.ly/IFHQ50ylOWo . . . . . . . . #siteworkstudios #landscapearchitecture #landscapearchitect #landplanning #urbandesign #urbandesigner #landscapedesign